Music streaming

Four Tet wins major victory for artists in music streaming court case

Four Tet marked one great victory for artists regarding streaming service royalties yesterday.

The UK-based artist has been in a legal battle with his former label, Domino records, dating from last summer. Four Tet originally sued Domino Records in August last year. He was seeking royalty rate damages for his albums produced for the label in the 2000s. Since the industry operated very differently back then due to the lack of digital streaming platforms, Four Tet wanted 50% of royalties from streaming and downloads.

In response to the lawsuit, Domino pulled all of his albums from streaming services and subsequently received vocal backlash from Four Tet, his fans, and other artists. Today, however, Four Tet can claim victory, as Domino has agreed to settle the case by acknowledging their original claim. His albums have been re-uploaded to streaming services.

Four Tet released a statement on social media, encouraging artists “who might feel intimidated into challenging a record company with substantial means”. You can check out the series of tweets from him below, reflecting on the situation now that it’s finally over.

I have a bodacious update on my case with @Dominorecordco. They acknowledged my original request that I should receive a 50% royalty on streaming and downloads, and that they should be treated as a license rather than a CD or vinyl sale.
(1/8)

— Four Tet (@FourTet) June 20, 2022

It has been a difficult and stressful experience navigating my way through this court case and I am so happy that we have achieved this positive outcome, but I am extremely relieved that the process is complete.
(2/8)

— Four Tet (@FourTet) June 20, 2022

I hope I opened a constructive dialogue and perhaps inspired others to push for a fairer deal on historic contracts, written at a time when the music industry operated in a totally different way.
(3/8)

— Four Tet (@FourTet) June 20, 2022

I really hope that my own course of action will encourage anyone who might feel intimidated by challenging a record label with substantial resources.
(4/8)

— Four Tet (@FourTet) June 20, 2022

Unlike Domino, I didn’t work with a major law firm and luckily the case went through the IPEC tribunal (where court costs are capped) so I was able to hold Well.
(5/8)

— Four Tet (@FourTet) June 20, 2022

Unfortunately, Domino still owns parts of my catalog for the life of the copyright and would not give me the option to regain ownership.
(6/8)

— Four Tet (@FourTet) June 20, 2022

I hope these types of copyright agreements go away – the music industry isn’t final and given its evolving nature it seems crazy to me to try to institutionalize the music of this way.
(7/8)

— Four Tet (@FourTet) June 20, 2022

I’m so grateful to the people who worked with me on this project, they all understood my motivation, and I’m really grateful to all the fans and artists who showed their support for the intention here.
(8/8)

— Four Tet (@FourTet) June 20, 2022



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